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Arabic Numbers
 

٠

0

sifr

١

1

wahid

٢

2

ithnan

٣

3

thalatha (th as in bath)

٤

4

arba’a

٥

5

khamsa

٦

6

sitta

٧

7

sab’a

٨

8

thamaniya (th in thin)

٩

9

tis’a

١٠

10

‘ashra

١١

11

ahada ‘ashar

١٢

12

ithna ‘ashar

١٣

13

thalatha ‘ashar

١٤

14

arba’a ‘ashar

١٥

15

khamsa ‘ashar

١٦

16

sitta ‘ashar

١٧

17

sab’a ‘ashar

١٨

18

thamaniya ‘ashar

١٩

19

tis’a ‘ashar

٢٠

20

‘ishrun

٢١

21

wahed wa-’ishrun

٢٢

22

ithnane wa-’ishrun

٢٣

23

thalatha wa-’ishrun

٢٤

24

arba’a wa-’ishrun

٢٥

25

khamsa wa-’ishrun

٢٦

26

sitta wa-’ishrun

٢٧

27

sab’a wa-’ishrun

٢٨

28

thamaniya wa-’ishrun

٢٩

29

tis’a wa-’ishrun

٣٠

30

thalathun

٣١

31

wahid wa-thalathun

٤٠

40

arba’un

٤٢

42

ithnan wa-arba’un

٥٠

50

khamsun

٥٣

53

thalatha wa-khamsun

٦٠

60

sittun

٦٤

64

arba'a wa-sittun

٧٠

70

sab’un

٧٥

75

khamsa wa-sab’un

٨٠

80

thamanun

٨٦

86

sitta wa-thamanun

٩٠

90

tis’un

٩٧

97

sab'a wa-tis’un

١٠٠

100

mi'a

١٠٠٠

1000

alf

١٠٠٠٠٠

100000

mi'at alf

٢٠٠٠

2000

alfain

١٠٠٠٠٠٠٠

10000000

Million

 

 

 

 

Forming numbers in Arabic is quite easy, from 13 to 19 you just place a number before ten for example 13 = three ten, instead of thirteen in English, 17 is seven ten in Arabic. From 21 to 99 you just need to reverse the numbers and add (wa- between the two numbers) 36 would be six wa- thirty instead of thirty six (sitta wa-thalathun), (wa means and).

0 is sifr in Arabic, from which the word cipher came. For 11 and 12 they’re irregular, so just remember how to write them by now (11 = ehda ‘ashar, 12 = ithna ‘ashar).

So in general, numbers standing alone are easy to use, or say. The hard part is that numbers 3 to 10 have a unique rule of agreement with nouns known as polarity: A numeral in masculine gender should agree with a feminine referrer and vice versa (thalathatu awlaad = three boys), boys are masculine plural, so the feminine form of number 3 should be used (which is thalathatu, and not thalathu which is the masculine form, the u at the end of numbers is used when a number is followed by another word to make an easy jump to the next word) (thalathu banaat = three girls) banaat = girls, which is feminine plural, therefore a masculine form of number 3 should be used (thalathu).

That may sound complicated but once you get used to it, it will not be as hard as it seems now, besides most Arab natives make mistakes or simply don’t care about matching the gender and the number.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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